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    Can Dogs Eat Acorns?

    Can Dogs Eat Acorns?

    by Health / 3 min read

     

    Estimated read time: 2 minutes

    Summary: In this blog, we'll discover if dogs can eat acorns. Learn if acorns are bad for dogs and what the signs and symptoms of acorn poisoning are...

     

    Fall has finally arrived in many states across the US. The days are getting shorter, the temperature is dropping, and the trees are turning golden orange and brown with an array of fallen leaves sprinkled on the ground.  

    However, leaves aren’t the only thing falling from the trees during this season... 

    Acorns and other tree nuts drop in their abundance this time of year, providing the perfect snack for local wildlife – including your dog!  

    But can dogs eat acorns? And are acorns poisonous for dogs?...

    Where Do Acorns Come From?

    As mentioned above, acorns grow on trees, specifically oak trees. The recognizable hard outer shell contains a small seed inside, which, when in the correct environment, will grow into a new oak tree.  

    Acorns can take anywhere between 5 and 24 months to fully mature, transforming from a green to a brown as they ripen. Once they’re mature, the acorns drop from the oak trees, ready to grow into another tree. Many animals, including ducks, mice, squirrels, and woodpeckers depend on these hard nuts in their diet, but can dogs eat acorns, too?

    A close-up shot of ripened acorns piled on top of one another. 

    Are Acorns Bad For Dogs?

    So, can dogs eat acorns? The answer is a simple, no! 

    Apart from the obvious choking hazard, acorns contain tannins that, in large quantities, can be harmful and dangerous to dogs. When acorns are green, they normally contain a higher volume of tannins, compared to when they’re brown and more ripened.  

    There are lots of variables that can cause your dog to be severely unwell or just have a bad stomach after eating acorns. Your dog’s size, breed, how many they eat, and other existing health conditions come into play with acorns.  

    If your dog was to consume a small number of acorns, it can result in stomach upset, however, a lot of acorns can make your dog extremely unwell. And, unfortunately, to make matters even more complicated, the number of tannins in each acorn varies, which means it can be difficult to know how your dog will react if they eat a single acorn.

    Signs Your Dog Has Eaten Acorns

    If your pup has eaten acorns, whether it’s one or multiple, they can become unwell quickly. If you notice the following, contact your vet as soon as possible... 

    Signs of acorn poisoning include: 

    Acorn poisoning in dogs can also cause damage to the liver and kidneys. 

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